Tag Archives: hillary

Hillary Piece by Robin Morgan

Goodbye To All That (#2) by Robin Morgan

robin morgan

An award-winning writer, feminist leader, political analyst, journalist, editor, and co-founder of the Women’s Media Center, Robin Morgan has published 21 books, including six of poetry, four of fiction, and the now-classic anthologies Sisterhood Is Powerful, Sisterhood Is Global, and Sisterhood Is Forever.

Her work has been translated into 13 languages. A founder of contemporary U.S. feminism, she has also been a leader in the international women’s movement for 25 years. Recent books include A Hot January: Poems 1996-1999; Saturday’s Child: A Memoir; her best-selling The Demon Lover: The Roots of Terrorism, updated and reissued in 2001; and her novel, The Burning Time. Her nonfiction work, Fighting Words: A Tool Kit for Combating the Religious Right, came out in September 2006.
http://www.womensmediacenter.com/ex/020108.html

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When Women Rule

Check this op-ed in the New York Times about why it is so hard for women to overcome the prejudice against them to lead. As you will see in this article it isn’t all coming from men. Read about the women in the village in India and how they didn’t come around until the next generation of female leaders. Hillary has an uphill battle and this is a big part of the reason. We live in a patriarchy and the foundations holding that system up are men AND women. I’m not advocating the opposite here…matriarchy…although I have to admitted I have entertained the fantasy. What I am advocating for is a system of equal justice for all of us. That to me is the only form of true Democracy and I believe we have never had that yet in the United States. I’m hoping to see it in my lifetime but sometimes it seems like we have so far to go…

New York Times Op-Ed Columnist
When Women Rule

By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
Published: February 10, 2008
While no woman has been president of the United States — yet — the world does have several thousand years’ worth of experience with female leaders. And I have to acknowledge it: Their historical record puts men’s to shame.
Read article here

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Hillary in Nashville

Emily and I went to the town hall meeting last night with Hillary Clinton.

hillary

It was in the main auditorium at TSU campus and the place was so full the fire marshall quit letting people in.

me at hillary town meeting

Our friend Elaine took this one of me from across the room. Really bad hair day as you can see. We were dressed for an hour wait outside to get in but as it turned out they were prepared for the crowd and we went right inside. The temperature was in the 30’s so that was lucky for us. The cold didn’t keep many away.

press

The press was out in full force. Nice to see the bloggers with a little more respect these days. Several were sitting among the camera and newspaper folks typing away on their laptops. Could someone please explain to me what good those light boxes do up there? These guys are all the way across the auditorium from Hillary.

I went to one 4 years ago for Wesley Clark when he was running but this seemed to have more excitement and definitely a much larger crowd. This a shot of some of the lines waiting to get in. This was only a tiny segment of it. It snaked up and down the halls, lobby and out the main door to the sidewalk.

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This is a shot of the TSU marching Band playing before she came on.

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This was taken about a half hour before it started. The room was beginning to fill up but a huge mass of people came and stood on the floor near the speaker right before it began. We had to stand up on the bleachers to see her at all.

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She answered a lot of questions from the audience after her speech and got the crowd going a few times. One when she mentioned something about replacing those two oilmen in the whitehouse.

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Nice to see Democracy in action here in Tennessee. I think any one of the democratic candidates could do a whole lot better than what we’ve had the last 7 years but I hope we pick Hillary this time. She smart, she’s tuff, she’s had plenty of experience fighting the right wing spin machine and she already knows the games the republicans will be playing. There’s a giant mess that whoever gets in is going to be left to clean up. There’s no time to stop and figure out the game. She would hit the ground running I think. We need Zena…I’ll take Hillary.

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Hillary’s new video targeting younger voters

UK Article about women turning out to support Hillary in New Hampshire
http://www.guardian.co.uk/uselections08/hillaryclinton/story/0,,2239617,00.html

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Gloria Steinem on Hillary Clinton’s run for the White House

I found this in today’s new york times…

New York Times Op-Ed Contributor
Women Are Never Front-Runners

By GLORIA STEINEM
Published: January 8, 2008
Correction Appended

THE woman in question became a lawyer after some years as a community organizer, married a corporate lawyer and is the mother of two little girls, ages 9 and 6. Herself the daughter of a white American mother and a black African father — in this race-conscious country, she is considered black — she served as a state legislator for eight years, and became an inspirational voice for national unity.

Be honest: Do you think this is the biography of someone who could be elected to the United States Senate? After less than one term there, do you believe she could be a viable candidate to head the most powerful nation on earth?

If you answered no to either question, you’re not alone. Gender is probably the most restricting force in American life, whether the question is who must be in the kitchen or who could be in the White House. This country is way down the list of countries electing women and, according to one study, it polarizes gender roles more than the average democracy.

That’s why the Iowa primary was following our historical pattern of making change. Black men were given the vote a half-century before women of any race were allowed to mark a ballot, and generally have ascended to positions of power, from the military to the boardroom, before any women (with the possible exception of obedient family members in the latter).

If the lawyer described above had been just as charismatic but named, say, Achola Obama instead of Barack Obama, her goose would have been cooked long ago. Indeed, neither she nor Hillary Clinton could have used Mr. Obama’s public style — or Bill Clinton’s either — without being considered too emotional by Washington pundits.

So why is the sex barrier not taken as seriously as the racial one? The reasons are as pervasive as the air we breathe: because sexism is still confused with nature as racism once was; because anything that affects males is seen as more serious than anything that affects “only” the female half of the human race; because children are still raised mostly by women (to put it mildly) so men especially tend to feel they are regressing to childhood when dealing with a powerful woman; because racism stereotyped black men as more “masculine” for so long that some white men find their presence to be masculinity-affirming (as long as there aren’t too many of them); and because there is still no “right” way to be a woman in public power without being considered a you-know-what.

I’m not advocating a competition for who has it toughest. The caste systems of sex and race are interdependent and can only be uprooted together. That’s why Senators Clinton and Obama have to be careful not to let a healthy debate turn into the kind of hostility that the news media love. Both will need a coalition of outsiders to win a general election. The abolition and suffrage movements progressed when united and were damaged by division; we should remember that.

I’m supporting Senator Clinton because like Senator Obama she has community organizing experience, but she also has more years in the Senate, an unprecedented eight years of on-the-job training in the White House, no masculinity to prove, the potential to tap a huge reservoir of this country’s talent by her example, and now even the courage to break the no-tears rule. I’m not opposing Mr. Obama; if he’s the nominee, I’ll volunteer. Indeed, if you look at votes during their two-year overlap in the Senate, they were the same more than 90 percent of the time. Besides, to clean up the mess left by President Bush, we may need two terms of President Clinton and two of President Obama.

But what worries me is that he is seen as unifying by his race while she is seen as divisive by her sex.

What worries me is that she is accused of “playing the gender card” when citing the old boys’ club, while he is seen as unifying by citing civil rights confrontations.

What worries me is that male Iowa voters were seen as gender-free when supporting their own, while female voters were seen as biased if they did and disloyal if they didn’t.

What worries me is that reporters ignore Mr. Obama’s dependence on the old — for instance, the frequent campaign comparisons to John F. Kennedy — while not challenging the slander that her progressive policies are part of the Washington status quo.

What worries me is that some women, perhaps especially younger ones, hope to deny or escape the sexual caste system; thus Iowa women over 50 and 60, who disproportionately supported Senator Clinton, proved once again that women are the one group that grows more radical with age.

This country can no longer afford to choose our leaders from a talent pool limited by sex, race, money, powerful fathers and paper degrees. It’s time to take equal pride in breaking all the barriers. We have to be able to say: “I’m supporting her because she’ll be a great president and because she’s a woman.”

Gloria Steinem is a co-founder of the Women’s Media Center.

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LGBT’s endorsing Hillary

I found this list published in the Advocate in June. It’s the Hillary LGBT steering commitee…

As president, the statement says, Clinton would work with the community to make sure that all Americans in committed relationships have equal economic benefits and rights (so far, she backs civil unions); work to end discrimination in adoption laws; put an end to what she has called “the failed policy” of “don’t ask, don’t tell”; and sign into law expanded federal hate-crimes legislation and the Employment Non-Discrimination Act (ENDA) if they are approved by Congress. (Kerry Eleveld, The Advocate)

LGBT Americans for Hillary steering committee members:

· Eldie Acheson, former U.S. assistant attorney general; founding director, public policy and government affairs, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force

· Roberta Achtenberg, former assistant secretary, U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development

· Toni Atkins, San Diego City Council member

· Dr. Christopher Barley, activist, philanthropist

· Greg Berlanti, creator/producer, TV series, Brothers and Sisters

· Elizabeth Birch, former executive director, Human Rights Campaign

· Mary Breslauer, former cochair, Kerry-Edwards 2004 LGBT steering committee; communications consultant

· Tonio Burgos, member, Democratic National Committee LGBT Caucus

· Ilene Chaiken, creator/producer, Showtime series The L Word

· Rocco Claps, former LGBT outreach director, Democratic National Committee; Illinois LGBT activist

· Bruce Cohen, Oscar-winning film producer

· Roberta Conroy, member, National Leadership Council, Lambda Legal

· Joan Darrah, retired U.S. Navy captain

· Q. Todd Dickinson, former under secretary of commerce for intellectual

property and director of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office

· Thomas Duane, New York State senator

· Ingrid Duran, board member, Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation

· Steve Elmendorf, deputy campaign manager, Kerry-Edwards 2004

· Shelley Freeman, business leader, Los Angeles Police commissioner

· Ethan Geto, longtime gay-rights advocate

· John Gile, executive director, Project Angel Food

· Emily Giske, member, Democratic National Committee LGBT Caucus

· Deborah Glick, New York assembly member

· Steven Goldstein, chair, Garden State Equality

· Chad Griffin, CEO, Chad Griffin Consulting Inc.

· Rebecca Haag, executive director, AIDS Action Council; executive director, AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts

· Yashar Hedayat, businessman

· Lisa Henderson, general manager, Olivia Cruises

· Stephen Herbits, businessman

· Fred Hochberg, former deputy then acting administrator, U.S. Small Business Administration; dean of the Milano School for Management and Urban Policy, the New School

· John Isa, board of directors and business council member, Human Rights Campaign

· Gloria Johnson, board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Christine Kehoe, California State senator

· Keith Kerr, retired colonel, U.S. Army; retired brigadier general, California National Reserve

· Kasey Kincaid, attorney, Iowa grassroots activist

· Billie Jean King, sports legend and social pioneer

· Sheila James Kuehl, California State senator

· Mark Kvare, board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Neel Lattimore, special advisor for strategic communications, Children’s Defense Fund; former press secretary for the first lady

· Bruce Lehman, former U.S. assistant secretary of Commerce and commissioner of Patents and Trademarks

· Sue Lovell, Houston City Council member

· Claire Lucas, chair, Democratic National Committee LGBT Leadership Council; board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Linda Gray Murphy, board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Daniel O’Donnell, New York assembly member

· Dixon Osburn, LGBT activist on “don’t ask, don’t tell” policy

· Annise Parker, Houston city controller

· Catherine Pino, board member, National Gay and Lesbian Chamber of Commerce

· Julian Potter, former special assistant to the president as liaison to the gay and lesbian community

· Christine Quinn, speaker, New York City Council

· Hilary Rosen, president, OurChart.com; media industry consultant

· Peter Rosenstein, D.C.-based LGBT community activist

· Mirian Saez, member, Democratic National Committee LGBT Caucus

· Greg Sargent, attorney, New Hampshire LGBT activist

· Jayne Baron Sherman, cochair, In the Life Media; former board chair, Lambda Legal

· Melissa Sklarz, director, New York Trans Rights Organization; vice chair, National Stonewall Democrats

· Paul M. Smith, board member, Lambda Legal; attorney who successfully argued the landmark Supreme Court case Lawrence v. Texas, establishing the right to privacy for gay Americans

· Jeff Soref, former chair of the Democratic National Committee LGBT Caucus; former cochair, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force

· Laura Spanjian, board member, Gay and Lesbian Victory Fund; board member, Equality California

· Campbell Spencer, former national LGBT outreach director for the Democratic National Committee and Gore-Lieberman 2000

· Rick Stafford, chair, Democratic National Committee LGBT Caucus; cochair, National Stonewall Democrats

· Jill Stauffer, board of directors, Human Rights Campaign

· Sally Susman, business leader

· Rev. Deborah Tammearu, Episcopal priest, Diocese of New York

· Matthew Titone, New York State assembly member

· Jeffrey Tooke, board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Olive F. Watson, activist and philanthropist

· Paula Redd Zeman, vice chair, National Gay and Lesbian Task Force; vice chair, Black Democrats of Westchester

· Bob Zuckerman, board member, National Stonewall Democrats

· Jose Zuniga, retired U.S. Army sergeant and former Soldier of the Year; executive director, International Association of Physicians in AIDS Care

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